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list again? ho ho ho! >> forget the fiscal cliff. eric: forget the fiscal cliff, what about a container cliff and what that might do to the economy. a a nasty standoff between union workers and the companies could cripple the nation. unless two groups reach a deal, theyun planted strike down plano strike this weekend.if if the strike happened, some reports estimate for a billion dollars per day. >> there's no question, use the righte words, cripple the economy. the backbone of the trade on the export and import, eric. about $100 billion or more comes in and out where you have to have these strikes. co it is very devastating and could reverberate throughout thees country. food distributors, everybody would be affected by this strike if it goesrd forward. eric: what do the unions want and what is management willing to do, how far apart are these two groups? >> normally in a dispute with the unions it is about wages and benefits in this case it is not. what the unions are objecting to with reports i have been seeingu is new work rules andort deficiencies that support systems want to put i
have a huge impact on our economy just when it's most vulnerable to the approaching fiscal cliff. business groups and state leaders are now calling on the president to intervene, warning that a strike could really cost the country billions of dollars. if history is any indication, those warnings may be dead on. a lockout on the west coast back in 2002, remember that? lasted a total of ten days, and it cost the economy an estimated $1 billion each and every day. >>> a strike at the ports of los angeles and long beach earlier this month lasted eight days, an estimated loss of $650 million a day. a republican strategist and a former campaign aide for president george w. bush, julie roginsky is former political adviser to new jersey senate frank lautenberg. good to see you both. >> good to see you. gregg: didi, smoot-holly was passed decades ago for the purpose of putting tariff limits on incoming products. do we need to reexplore that? >> yeah. this was, this was back in the '60s. i mean, this was ancient history. why should these workers who get paid very well also get on top of th
on everyone immediately. if washington can't come to a deal on the fiscal cliff. >> you have less money in a difficult economy with little clarity. >> the economy will go down sharply. >> look at the number from the tax policy center. this is the average tax hit the families take on top of what they pay on taxes. those make between $40,000 and $50,000 pay extra $1700. >> if you manage to make over $200,000, it will be a big jump up. you will need to send a check to uncle sam for $14,000 initial dollars. $500,000 to $1 million pays $34,000 more. they want $215,000 on top of what you pay in taxes. >> the wealth manager says the money you have left as far as businesses also deal with their own tax hikes. >> you are going to see less money in your paycheck. >> the government has to bite the bullet with $1.2 trillion in spending cuts. more than half of that is to the defense budget. >> they say families may need austerity calculation before making big purchases. look at the money you have and the money you need in the future to decide if you need the next big picture. doug? >> doug: thank yo
the democratic controlled senate to lead our economy to the edge of the fiscal cliff. congress people from both parties are searching for a bipartisan solution. that is the leadership that america needs, not what we saw from the president this morning ." those of the comments from speaker boehner. the house has gaveled out. we expect them back in about two hours. let's go to newbury port. caller: thank you for c-span. i do not understand where this $250,000 number comes from. i am 70 and have never been asked to make a sacrifice by any congress. it just seems to me that if the average income in most states -- to ask people making $125,000 or more, to ask them to contribute more, that seems to be a no- brainer. i do not see why people in this country are not ready to make a compromise. let's face it, we will either all have to pay slightly more taxes and accept the fact that our benefits are going to have to be lower than they really are -- i am in that bracket of $125,000 to $250,000. i am very comfortable, i could contribute more to the deficit, i just want to make sure that that money goes to
that the fiscal cliff is disadvantageous to the economy in terms of jobs and taxes but if we know we are going over the cliff that provides policy certainty that allows corporations to act within the certainty of the new tax regime that comes out of it and it will help the deficit. i am speaking anathema but that is certainty. shibani: 70 -- dennis: something wins and the economy could make stocks right at some point. thank you very much, jim laventhol. here's one retail segment that did great. gun, rifle and ammunition sales are skyrocketing following the backlash against guns at the connecticut elementary school. the world's largest supplier of firearms says it sold 3.5 years worth of ammunition clips for automatic weapons in just three days and a gun shop owner north carolina says gun sales for christmas or four times better than last year. many customers blame talk of stricter gun control for driving the rush. unintended consequences. let's look at gun stocks. the images that so smith and wesson, they are down. the middle of their sales are probably up. shibani: one of the most profitable
conversations we'll have a bipartisan solution, because nobody wants to go over this fiscal cliff. it will damage our economy. it will hurt every taxpayer, the largest tax increase in history. it will affect everybody, and anyone who is watching who thinks, oh this isn't going to impact me, you will fin out d o will, and we know the problem is a lot of spending. not that we're not taxing people more, we're just spending too much. we hope that the president understands that as for as republicans are concerned, we're willing to negotiate and have a civil conversation, but also he's got to bring in some spending cuts and tax reform, because americans want tax reform and we don't want to hurt the economy, and, look there, are not enough millionaires in the united states to tax them all to be able to spend our way out of this problem. so let's -- let's give up a little bit -- each side can concede a little. and i think we can fin middle ground. i'm optimistic. >> we had your colleague nan hayworth last hour. she was expecting work to be done in the senate. the house did its best, boehn
, that if the u.s. were to really go over the u.s. fiscal cliff that the economy would go back into recession, unemployment would go from 7% to over 9%. that thousands of people would lose their jobs? >> no, wolf. i don't think there would be a permanent situation where we went over the fiscal cliff and nothing was done. my point is that if we went over the fiscal cliff and tax rates went up and spending cuts were substantial, that republicans would be under a huge pressure, even greater pressure than they are now to agree to a democratic initiative to cut middle class taxes and also restore the spending cuts that really do need to be restored. especially for the middle class and the poor. under the present circumstances, we to some extent have the worst of both worlds. the president loses the bargaining advantage of having that fiscal cliff and also having the public behind him. and has given in to republican demands of moving that threshold from $250,000 over $450,000. >> we've got to leave it there. grover norquist and robert reich, thanks to both of you. i know you'll be joining us later
it allows our country to go over the fiscal cliff and really hurts almost every american family in our country, in our economy, as a whole. this shouldn't be a surprise to us. it's not as if, if i could use the metaphor, that congress was going along in a bus and -- on a ride through the country and suddenly came to the end of the road and there was a cliff. this shouldn't be a surprise to us. we -- we -- we created this cliff ourselves a year and a half ago when we adopted the budget control act. and we created it for a very good reason: because we knew that we had proven ourselves incapable of making the compromises that were necessary to achieve the long-term bipartisan debt-reduction program that america desperately needs. we're over $16.4 trillion in debt. i'm in my last days as a u.s. senator. if you'd told me when i started that we'd be $16 trillion in debt, i wouldn't have believed it. frankly, if you told me just a dozen years ago at the end of the clinton administration when we were in surplus that we could possibly be $16 trillion in de debt, i would have thought -- well, i
.s. stock market. despite all those worries about the fiscal cliff and maybe slower growth in the u.s. economy, the stock market has had a great year. too bad you missed out. smart money's been on the market. the rest of us have been worried about the fiscal cliff. >> number eight, facebook's ipo. hundreds of millions of people like facebook, but investors did not on its first day as a public company. trading glitches at the nasdaq and questions about the company's ability to make money on mobile users pummeled the stock, which has yet to climb its way back to its ipo price. >> number seven, mother meyer. the new ceo of yahoo! who announced she was just going to take a two-week maternity leave as she tried to turn this company around. 37 years old, it looks like a mother's touch is what yahoo! needed. >> mother nature. an intense drought in the midwest that scorched the corn and soy crop, sending prices sky high. >> who can forget super storm sandy? neighborhoods along the northeast swept away, millions without power and damages as high as 50 billion dollars raising lots of question
, to bring it back to the current fiscal cliff talks -- during the campaign, you said that raising taxes is not a good way to help the u.s. economy. do you have an across the board opposition to raising taxes? >> i do believe that the worst thing to do any weak economy is to try to raise taxes. it is like pouring gasoline on fire. it is important to remember as a look at this debate, if the president gets all of his tax increases he is asking for, it $80 billion to the government. that is enough money to run the government for eight to 16 days. it will raise our deficit to somewhere around $1 trillion. i think we have to get aggressive about spending. we're going to have to look added title months if we're going to start to solve these problems. -- entitlements if we're going to start to solve these problems. i think the approach he has taken is one that is setting this process up for failure. the proof is the results of negotiations we have seen over the last couple weeks. >> would you have voted for plan b? >> as someone who has been out here in indiana, i do not know all the details o
as members of congress return to washington to address the fiscal cliff. talks will take place behind closed doors. no public negotiations set. you have the debt and the fiscal cliff. it's not looking too good right now when it comes to the u.s. economy. >> geithner told congressional leaders that his department is using some accounting measures basically a fancy way of saying they're going to free up cash to hold off temporarily this fiscal cliff. but it's still not looking good. >> i don't know about you at home, but kicking the can down the road has been happening over and over again. somebody has to make some decisions here. >> it's like in this business, they give you a deadline and you have to hit the deadline. there's no coming in and saying take another ten minutes. it don't work that way in real life. there are americans out there saying get off your couches. get back to washington and get the deal done. >> sometimes it's not pretty when you have to rush, but get it done. >>> still on the economy now, new signs of a turn around in the real estate market. for the first time since 200
: well, we're still trying that last ditch effort to keep the economy from going over the fiscal cliff. lawmakers are heading back to washington including the president with this year-end deadline that's been on the horizon. welcome, everybody, great to have you here. brand new hour of "happening now." kelly: i'm kelly wright in for jon scott -- jamie: and i'm jamie colby in for jenna today. kelly: talks hitting a dead end last week, now most americans are facing big tax hikes unless the two sides can work out a last minute deal. chief white house correspondent ed henry with more. >> reporter: you're right, really all eyes turning to plan c. plan a was that $4 trillion debt deal, plan b was speaker boehner's idea about tax increases only for million dollar incomes and more, now turning to plan c which is president obama's idea which is to move it back to $250,000 or more, that would be the threshold for tax cuts or tax increases in the other direction, also dealing with two million people who are losing their unemployment benefits, president wants to the take care of that by the end of
.com and ask your doctor about celebrex. for a body in motion. >> forget the fiscal cliff. how about a container cliff and what it may do to the economy. time's running short and a standoff between long shoreman union workers and companies could cripple the nation. unless they reach a deal they plan to strike this weekend. we reached out but haven't heard back yet. steve moore is here with us. if the strike happens, some estimates say $1 billion per day hit to the economy. >> yeah, there's no question. if you -- you used the right word, cripple the economy. the ports in this country are the backbone of our trade, both export and imports and i've read estimates of $100 billion or more comes in and out. so it cook devastating, and reverberate throughout the economy. retailers, wholesalers. food distributors, everybody would be affected by the strike if it goes forward. >> exactly what do the unions want and what is management willing to do? how far apart are the two groups? >> it's interesting. they're not really -- normally in a wage dispute with the union,ettes it's about wages and b
their way, will everyone pay? >> forget the fiscal cliff. how about a container cliff and what it m do to the economy. time's running short and a standoff between long shoreman union workers and companies could cripple the nation. unless they reach a dea they plan to strike this weekend. we reached out but haven't heard back yet. steve moore is here with us. if th strike happens, some estimates say $1 billion per day hit to the economy. >> yeah, the's no question. if you -- you used the right word, cripple the economy. the ports in this country are the backbone of our trade, both export and imports and i've read estimates of $100 billion or more comes in and out. so it cook devastating, and reverberate throughout the economy. retailers, whesalers. food distributors, everybody would be affected by the strike if it goes forward. >> exactly what do the unions want and what is management willing to do? how far apart arehe two groups? >> it's inresting. they're not really -- normally in a wage dispute with the union,ettes it's about wages and benefits but in this case it's not. what the uni
the fiscal cliff, the fiasco as well as the debt ceiling debacle. richard, how is this playing out? we understand richard is not here. we're going to talk to richard a little later about this. >>> eurovision, a singing competition, a lot like "american idol." it's popular, trendy, everybody's watching it. it launched the careers of abba and celine dion. now the radio show which is paid for by the countries that participate in it, it's now in trouble. the economy is to blame. here's our reporter. ♪ >> reporter: cheesy music. kitsch costumes. ♪ and national stereotypes. ♪ for 58 years, the eurovision song contest has united europeans in a celebration of music and at times laughter. ♪ but as countries struggle to meet budget targets, frills are starting to take a back seat. portugal, poland, slovakia and boz that herzegovina say they're pulling out of the competition because they can't afford to win. the czech republic and greece are also reported to want out. >> it costs to perform, and it costs to stage it. and what do you get back? bluntly a bunch of hoopla and a few pom-poms.
- called fiscal cliff. what we also have facing us starting tomorrow are automatic spending cuts that are scheduled to go into effect. keep in mind that some of the spending cuts that congress has said will automatically go into effect have an impact on our defense department but they also have an impact on things like head start. some programs that are scheduled to be cut and we're using an ax instead of a scalpel. they may not always be the smartest cuts. that is a piece of business that still has to be taking care of. i want to make clear that any agreement that we have to deal with these automatic spending cuts that are being threatened for next month, polls also have to be balanced. our principal has always been to do things in a balanced responsible way. that means revenue has to be part of the equation. the same is true for any future deficit agreement. obviously we're going to have to do more to reduce our debt and deficit. i'm willing to do more. it is going to have to be balanced. it has to be a balanced and responsible way. i'm willing to reduce our government's medic
force one early this morning and headed for washington to deal with unfinished fiscal cliff business. with just five days until the combination of automatic tax increases and spending cuts that could send the economy back into recession, mr. obama wants congress to take the lead in getting the job done. the senate convenes later today and senate majority leader harry reid told members to be prepared to address fiscal cliff issues through the weekend. reid is working on his own plan to get lawmakers to come together before the end of the year deadline. that plan would likely include letting the bush tax cuts expire for households making more than $250,000 a year and short term spending cuts instead of the massive long-term cuts that would happen if there is no deal. after our wednesday conference call, house republican leaders issued a statement saying they were waiting for the democratic controlled senate. the house will take this action on whatever the senate can pass they said but the senate first must act. in a sign of public frustration over the lack of a de
for their businesses, should they buy a new computer, hire new people, the fiscal cliff is damaging the economy today. >> juliet: what are they doing? they don't know what to do. you have to act the at a certain point. are they laying people or, are they not moving? >> it's minimalist, do the least amount you can do at this point in time until you know what your tax liability is going to be. until you know what the economic outlook's going be to be. are we going to have another recession. >> juliet: how is that affecting them by doing the least, the least type of movement, i guess you could say? >> many of my members are not giving out bonuses, they're freezing pay, not hiring. that's what's happening on the main street america. and the fiscal cliff impacted already and main street small businesses are feeling that impact. if we go over the cliff, of course, it will be exacerbated and even worse, starting on january 1, the payroll taxes start going up and the rest of us. i think most small businesses people are convinced nobody in washington has a clue how to run a business, how to balance the books,
forward and pass whenever bill is necessary so we can avoid this fiscal cliff. if we do not do that, it will result in the economy, a tepid recovery we are having to go into recession. we do not want that. host: thank you for the call, justin. a few comments on our facebook page -- we are taking your calls and tweets and facebook messages all morning on this segment and the next segment about the fiscal cliff. we will go to franklin from georgia on the democratic line. good morning. caller: good morning. i like to tell congress, congress is a mano kolinsky for the lobbyists. we have to deal with that. -- monica lewinsky for the lobbyists. we have to do that. they are putting money in their pockets so they can take vacations and revitalize their homes. host: do you think this fiscal cliff nonsense is to make more members of congress money. caller: yes. anytime you can say that corporations are people, you have already gone against -- i am talking about what the forefathers said. when they said that liberty and pursuit of happiness -- the two- party does not -- the tea party does not
a fainting spell brought on by a stomach bug. >>> and the fiscal cliff in washington isn't the only major threat to the u.s. economy. this morning, time is running out to avoid a strike by 14,000 dockworkers from boston to houston for demanding better pay. 14 ports which handle half of the nation's shipping traffic are threatened. workers could walk off the job this sunday, costing the economy an estimated $1 billion per day. >>> and for the second time this month, someone has been pushed to their death on a new york subway. a woman seen running away on the left side of this surveillance video, right here, shoved a man on to the tracks last night. he was then crushed by an oncoming train. witnesses say the woman was talking to herself, pacing on the platform before pushing the man from behind. and did not appear to even know the victim. >>> and finally, you don't have to be a football fan to be inspired by this story. for the first time since being diagnosed with leukemia in september, indianapolis colts head coach chuck pagano will return to the field this weekend, a symbol of strength a
if the country goes over the fiscal cliff. it is a cliff that lawmakers built, they have set the tuesday deadline and knew it was coming for more than a year, but until now, even now they have done precious little to agree on taxes and spending cuts by that time. keeping them honest, the people in this building have known what is coming on tuesday, yet they're only returning to get to this building to get back to work just now. senators came back yesterday. house members? well, they wouldn't be back until sunday. this afternoon, house and senate leaders met with president obama at the white house. they talked for about an hour. afterwards president obama said he was modestly optimistic. by passing house speaker john boehner who has had trouble getting his fellow republicans to agree to anything, the president called on senate majority and minority leaders harry reid and mitch mcconnell, to lay out a deal. >> if we don't see an agreement between the two leaders and the senate, i expect a bill to go on the floor. and i have asked senator reid to do this. put a bill on the floor that makes sure that
the fiscal cliff. it will be an interesting few days as congress starts to reconvene. and also as corporate america is taking up this fight as well. ceo howard schulze of starbucks urging workers at 120 washington area stores to start writing on their coffee cups, come together. >> are you serious? >> yes. yes. >> that should help. i think that's going to do it. >> problem solved. >> between that, and the pins. >> i never thought of that. >> can you imagine -- oh, good idea, howard schulze. but he says we deserve better. >> we probably do. >> he's right. >> a lot of them are still on vacation. house members have been told there's nothing scheduled for this week. but you could be called back with 48 hours' notice. so, in a perfect world, things could possibly come together. >> 48 hours' notice and we have five days to go. >> i'm not saying we're not cutting it awfully close, but that's where things stand as of right now. >> new new housing data out tod home prices rose 4.3% in the 12 months ending in october in a 20-city composite, beating analysts' forecasts. it did appear as 12 of the 20 c
to avoiding the fiscal cliff. >> i'm modestly optimistic that an agreement can be achieved. nobody is going to get 100% of what they want, but let's make sure that middle class families and the american economy and, in fact, the world economy aren't adversely impacted because people can't do their jobs. >> reporter: the president called the meeting as lawmakers pointed fingers in this high stakes game of chicken. >> it's republicans who are holding hostage the middle class in america so that the wealthy don't have to pay their fair share. >> we need two words, presidential leadership on not just taxing rich people, we could tax all the rich people and cut their heads off and it wouldn't help the medicare fiscal cliff. >> reporter: with time running out hopes for a grand bargain have diminished with talk now of a smaller deal that extend bush tax rate for the middle class and extends unemployment benefits but puts off major spending cuts and reform to entitlements like medicare. >> we're going to end up with a small kick the can down the road bill that creates another fiscal cliff to deal
. doesn't mean they're going to get anything done as far as the fiscal cliff is concerned and because the deadline is so tight, about the most we could hope for may be is some kind of temporary deal. if they don't come up with a pick, the economy may be in for a big jolt. >> we're going to see economic activity slow down. i think we're going to see, with the certainty of tax rates raising on all of us that people contract their economic activity. >> and look, here is why. when you take a look at the impact of these tax hikes, at low income levels, a few hundred dollars. but for people make more than $500,000 a year, an average tax hike of $120,000 unless there is some kind of a fix. and finally, here is one possible solution, i guess. starbucks is telling all of their employees here in the dc area to write on every single coffee they make, come together. that is not just a tall order, but maybe a venty. i think a venty. >> kelly: that's really a good idea. not a good one, doug. >> clayton: thanks. what was your beverage of choice this morning? is that your coffee cup? >> juliet: all r
budget deficit we have been running. host: you have been quoted as saying -- with the fiscal cliff we will see 1 million job losses. guest: that is the assessment we have been getting from the running of our models. the economy should be expanding to% or 3% next year without the -- should be expanding 2% or 3% next year without the fiscal cliff, that would correlate with about 2 million net new jobs next year. so it's a continuation of a steady expansion. i wish it was a little faster expansion, but nonetheless it is an expansion. if we had a fiscal cliff, and we are reversing all the gains we have seen. host: what about mortgage deduction on a second home or vacation home or a certain limit to the size of a mortgage? would you be supportive of that? guest: we have to recognize that negotiating away from what has been a striking departure from just protecting the mortgage interest deduction, property ownership. any breach to that invites further breaches. our members, even though they recognize the deck is a need to be resolved, in -- that the deficit needs to be resolved, any breach
? >>> fears of the fiscal cliff are taking some of the holiday cheer right out of wall street. cnn's alison kosik watching the post-christmas trading as well as a threat to the economy that could come even sooner than the cliff? let's start with the stocks, though. >> reporter: yes, stocks, very quiet today, very quiet session. not many investors in the game today. expect that to be the case the rest of the week. the fun tny thing, this is usuay the time we see the santa claus rally. the dow down 46 points. no deal on the if i'm not mistaken. that's spoiling the rally so far. it could be worse, though. we've seen much harsher reaction to all the congressional shenanigans in the past that could be a sign the economy is in better shape this time around. the s&p 500 is still on track for a 13% gain for the year. >>alison, what's the container cliff? >> reporter: the container cliff could be serious stuff. it could be a major threat to the economy. but it's also something that can be avoided. this container cliff is the name the national retail federation has given to this situation if workers
mobile app. >>> from the cnn money newsroom in new york, i'm ali velshi. this is your money. the fiscal cliff is a battle of ideological wills. some americans feel strongly that increasing taxes hurts the economy. quite possible that it will. but the central question is whether it will hurt all that much to raise income taxes a little bit on the highest earners in the country. well, to push the country to the edge of a recession over this is irresponsible. the increase will hardly affect the economy. but that's my opinion. and my opinion should count as much as anyone else's. the problem is that in washington one person's opinion carries disproportionate weight and that person is grover norquist. he's the head of americans for tax reform. they have got the pledge that mostly republican members of congress signed to say they won't increase taxes. now, understand this. the top marginal tax rate going from 35% to 39.6% is not a tax increase. it is a return to tax rates that would have taken place after the temporary bush tax cuts expired and got extended. so the way i see it, that cuts wit
to the white house today to work on the ever looming fiscal cliff. can he cut a deal with republicans. >>> and david gregory may be in trouble of the law because of that ammo thing he has on his anchor desk. [ male announcer ] the more you lose, the more you lose, because for every two pounds you lose through diet and exercise, alli can help you lose one more by blocking some of the fat you eat. let's fight fat with alli. ♪ ♪ you make me happy when skies are gray ♪ [ female announcer ] you know exactly what it takes to make them feel better. ♪ you make me happy [ female announcer ] that's why you choose children's tylenol. the same brand your mom trusted for you when you were young. ♪ how much i love you [ humming ] [ female announcer ] children's tylenol, the #1 brand of pain and fever relief recommended by pediatricians and used by moms decade after decade. [ humming ] by the armful? by the barrelful? the carful? how about...by the bowlful? campbell's soups give you nutrition, energy, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> th
: in the new year, i think they come to some resolution of the fiscal cliff. we are looking forward to another year like we had. 2% growth are a little less. the prospects this quarter were impaired by the cliff, and we expect that to go forward into the next quarter. host: the president coming into town tonight, and the congress tomorrow. realistically, what do you think will happen? guest: i do not think a lot will happen and i think we will go over the cliff. i am an economist, not a politician. i do not believe that the republicans will give the president merely a tax increase on people over $250,000. there are not able to push that through the house with some spending cuts. that does not seem to make much sense. host: peter will be here for 40 minutes taking your calls and tweets about the u.s. economy. we continue to take a look at economic matters. our guest recently wrote about the debt limit. the headline in "the boston globe" -- do you agree with that sentiment? guest: i would hope it would not threaten the economy again. it is all bound up in this issue of curbing government spendi
as fractious as it could be. washington is a divided city. the fiscal cliff -- i believe both sides know what to do. it is going to be painful. either raise taxes or cut spending. both need to be done. our taxes are going to go up. some good programs will be cut automatically on january 1 if they do not come up with an agreement. that was designed by the politicians to deal with the fiscal problems. it reminds me of the old "national lampoon" comfort that if you don't buy this magazine, we will shoot this dog. save us from ourselves or help us save us from ourselves. it didn't work. they have about a week to go. i suspect they will kick the can down the road. a short-term way to get is passed the immediate collapse of what is stalling certain cuts. maybe unemployment benefits, that kind of thing. i think there will give a short- term answer. host: a lot of headlines are about the republicans and their caucus. what about democrats? are they at fault as well? "we do not want medicare to be touched." the democrats see have put their feet down and said, "we will not do anything." the republican p
to avoid the fiscal cliff? if so, what are they? >> well, obviously, there are cuts in the budget. we know we have to cut some of the mandatory programs and do other cuts, but it has to be accompanied with revenues. willie, i'm getting a little more optimistic today. sometimes it's darkest before the dawn. there are two good signs for optimism today. one is that leader mcconnell is actively engaged. you can't pass anything in the senate without democratic and republican votes because of the 60-vote barrier. we only have 53. for the first time, leader mcconnell is speaking to the president. if the senate is going to be the place where action starts, you need both of them there. the second reason for optimism is boehner is back at the table. because you can't pass something just through the senate. we see what a mess the house is. they couldn't even pass speaker boehner's own plan b. the fact that he's come back and the four of them are at the table means to me we could come up with some kind of agreement that would avoid the main parts of the fiscal cliff, particularly taxes going up on mid
on the fiscal cliff. that's spoiling the rally so far. it could be worse. we have seen much bigger negative reaction to all these congressional shenanigans in the past. could be a sign the economy is in better shape this time around. you just look at the s&p 500, victor, still on track for a 13% gain for the year. that's as we look at all the red on the screen. victor? >> a lot of red there is. red and green. wish we had more green. alison kosik, thank you. >>> if you weren't able to watch your favorite christmas classic on netflix, we know why. the video streaming service is blaming a massive outage at one of amazon's web service centers. they say it happened on christmas eve. now, netflix has millions of subscribers in the u.s., canada, latin america, most folks have service up and running again by christmas day, though. if they missed it going into christmas, they can watch it in the evening. one netflix official says they're looking at how to prevent something like this from happening again. >>> russia is trying to put the brakes on americans adopting russian children. and today that ba
and the president over possible ways to avoid the fiscal cliff. large employers are very actively encouraging those negotiations to succeed. very important from the health of the overall economy that does succeed or it could come up as part of entitlement reform in which gail thinks may not occur until 2016 or beyond and it could come sooner or possibly even as part of a broader negotiation over tax reform. so you really have to look not a think just of the possibility of a change in medicare eligibility age for the broader context in which that change could come about. >> thank you very much, paul. to get to the point where we can hear your comments, here your questions. there are question card you can fill out and someone will bring it forward. there are microphones on either side of the round that you can line up behind to ask your question. i know tricia has been scribbling questions right and left as we were going through the presentations. do you want to start us off? >> sure. one of the ideas that gail mentioned that has been put on the table is by zeke emanuel that would apply lifetimes ear
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